September 24, 2020

QUESTION:         May a physician be on-call for more than one hospital at the same time (take “simultaneous call”) or perform elective surgeries while on call?  If so, is that physician required to identify a specific back-up physician who will take calls at our hospital if the original physician is called to another hospital or is in the middle of an elective surgery when called by our hospital?

 

ANSWER:           CMS doesn’t specifically require that another physician be identified to take back-up call if the original on-call physician is performing elective surgery or is taking call at another hospital when the ED needs assistance.  Instead, CMS says that a “back-up plan” must be in place.  Per CMS, “some hospitals may employ the use of ‘jeopardy’ or back-up call schedules,” indicating that other hospitals may choose to not use back-up call schedules.  Here’s the full quote from the EMTALA Interpretive Guidelines (found in Appendix V of the Medicare State Operations Manual):

The [hospital’s] policies and procedures must also ensure that the hospital provides emergency services that meet the needs of an individual with an EMC [Emergency Medical Condition] if the hospital chooses to employ any of the on-call options permitted under the regulations, i.e., community call, simultaneous call, or elective procedures while on-call. In other words, there must be a back-up plan to these optional arrangements. For instance, some hospitals may employ the use of “jeopardy” or back-up call schedules to be used only under extreme circumstances. The hospital must be able to demonstrate that hospital staff is aware of and able to execute the back-up procedures.

https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_v_emerg.pdf

Of course, a hospital may decide that it’s On-Call Policy will not permit simultaneous call or elective surgeries while on call.  Or, a hospital’s policy may require on-call physicians to identify a specific individual to provide back-up coverage in such cases.  The key is to clearly identify the requirements in the hospital’s On-Call Policy.

July 5, 2018

QUESTION:        Our On-Call Policy requires physicians to have 30 admissions or operating cases at the hospital per year to participate in the on-call schedule.  The Policy also gives discretion to the department chairs, who develop the call schedules, to limit the ability of a particular physician to participate in the schedule for a number of reasons, some of which have nothing to do with the quality of care being provided.  Do these provisions in our Policy pose any legal concerns?

ANSWER:            Yes.  First, conditioning participation in the call schedule on admissions at, or procedures done in, the hospital could be interpreted as conditioning participation on referrals to the hospital.  Such a requirement could present compliance issues with the federal Anti-Kickback Statute.  In Supplemental Compliance Program Guidance for Hospitals, the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) cautioned that “conditioning privileges on a particular number of referrals or requiring the performance of a particular number of procedures, beyond volumes necessary to ensure clinical proficiency, potentially raise substantial risks under the [Anti-Kickback] statute.”  Some state courts have found that participation on the call-coverage roster constitutes a “privilege.”

May 3, 2018

QUESTION:        We’re revisiting our on-call policy and we’re debating whether to set specific rules on physician response times.  Has CMS issued any guidance on this?

ANSWER:            Yes.  CMS advises hospitals to establish detailed, specific guidelines on physician response times.  In particular, CMS has said that a hospital would be “well?advised to establish in its on-call policies and procedures specific guidelines – e.g., the maximum number of minutes that may elapse between receipt of a request and the physician’s appearance for what constitutes a reasonable response time, and to make sure that its on-call physicians and other staff are aware of these time-sensitive requirements.”

This kind of agency guidance is not mandatory, but from a best practice perspective, we would encourage you to craft an on-call policy that follows this advice.  We recommend that you set a bright-line rule for acceptable physician response times.  The rule should be expressed in minutes.

You can carve out well-defined and carefully considered exceptions to the rule (so long as they are otherwise compliant with the law) if you want to allow for more flexibility.  The key is to have clear, detailed, specific guidelines in your policy.